miércoles, 16 de agosto de 2017

A Beatles interlude in our immigration policy debate







www.kansascity.com
A Beatles interlude in our immigration policy debate
BY MARY SANCHEZ
AUGUST 11, 2017


We can now read the records of Beatle George Harrison’s battles with U.S. immigration authorities. AP

A handwritten note on top of the telegram asks, “Is this one of the former Beatles?”

Yes, it was.

The telegram, a terse protest of the bombing of Cambodia, was addressed to then-President Richard Nixon and sent to the White House by George Harrison on August 16, 1973.

It is one page of 90 released by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

George Harrison’s A-file is basically a history of his interactions with U.S. immigration. It covers more than 20 years and now appears online along with the files of other notable foreigners who have come before the agency.

Harrison’s records are noteworthy because they help complete a story of government paranoia, of Nixon’s exploitation of federal agents to undercut what was then growing youth dissent toward the Vietnam War. Not a small factor was Nixon’s own fear that he wouldn’t be re-elected in 1972. He was re-elected but famously fell to his own dissembling and obstruction of justice in the Watergate scandal.

Harrison’s squabbles with immigration might be labeled collateral damage. Nixon’s main target then was another former Beatle, John Lennon, who was far more politically active.

Still, the telegram is intriguing.

Harrison was angry that his request for a visa extension had been denied, due to a prior pot conviction in England. He’d previously been granted entry, despite officials knowing about the 1969 conviction. Here is the text of the telegram, retaining the misspellings and garbled syntax:

“Sir how can you bomb Cambonian citizens and worry about kicking me out of the country for smoking marijuana at the time. Your repressive emperaour war monger ways stop before too piece luv we will run the world Harry Krisher Hare Hara Krishne Hare Hara Hare Hara Krishner. George Harrison.”

It’s appropriate that these pages are available now. Once again the nation is led by a paranoid, self-obsessed president motivated by deep resentments that rival any regard for the nation and its security. Many comparisons have been made between Donald Trump and the Richard Nixon, with more than a few foreseeing a similar, self-made demise.

When you hear politicians bemoan the outspokenness of Hollywood celebrities, of musicians who make headlines for their political views, not their talent, it’s an echo of the Beatles era.

Lennon was hounded by Nixon and FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. It took a Freedom of Information Act request followed by a 25-year legal battle before journalist Jon Wiener gained the release of government files chronicling the FBI’s surveillance of Lennon, including efforts to catch him with narcotics, which could then be used as a rationale for deporting him.

The files are astounding and chronicled in Wiener’s 1999 book, “Gimme Some Truth: The John Lennon FBI Files.”

Harrison’s immigration file further completes the picture.

Like Lennon, Harrison’s previous conviction for marijuana possession was used at times as a reason to block his visas, and at other times it was ignored. The difference seemed to be whether or not the government thought that he was being too outspoken. Fears, especially for Nixon, were high as the 1972 Republican National Convention neared. He believed that Lennon was helping plot violent demonstrations.

A September 1971 letter in Harrison’s file is a note among immigration officials advising that any requests by Harrison or Lennon should be sent to a higher office. It describes them as “personalities who may receive public attention in the U.S., which would result in unfavorable publicity to this office.”

Harrison’s file includes correspondence from 1970 in which representatives of “The Ed Sullivan Show” noted that the Beatles services are no longer needed and should not be used as a rationale to grant them visas at the London embassy.

All of this is a cautionary tale in a time when questioning the government is once more being met with jeers about disloyalty and when facts considered uncomfortable to the president are “fake news.”

Ironically, the lesson comes through the experiences of four British lads who brought a musical revolution to America.


Related image

George, John and Yoko

martes, 15 de agosto de 2017

John Lennon peace website launches to celebrate new 'Imagine' picture book








www.amnesty.org.uk
John Lennon peace website launches to celebrate new 'Imagine' picture book

MONDAY, 14TH AUGUST 2017




People from around the world write peace messages ahead of the publication of the first picture book set to Lennon’s ‘Imagine’ lyrics
Celebrities including Richard Curtis and Juliet Stevenson have already joined the online global act of solidarity
Messages will be shared to mark International Day of Peace
People from around the world are writing messages of peace to celebrate John Lennon’s iconic ‘Imagine’ lyrics, which will be published for the first time as a picture book on the UN’s International Day of Peace (September 21).
A new website, www.imaginepeacebook.com, has launched today (14 August) to allow people of all ages to share their messages of peace and hope in a global display of solidarity.
The messages will be shared on International Day of Peace to coincide with the launch of the book ‘Imagine’. Yoko Ono Lennon has granted the ‘Imagine’ lyrics to Amnesty International and Frances Lincoln Children’s Books to create the first ever picture book set to John Lennon's words. The book, which will be published in 15 languages, is illustrated by renowned French artist Jean Jullien. 
Kate Allen, Director of Amnesty International UK, said:
“Nearly half a century after it was first recorded, Imagine’s vision of a peaceful world without conflict, greed or hunger is as relevant as ever.
“John and Yoko’s dream of people standing up for what they believe in and breaking down barriers is something we strongly admire at Amnesty International. We know that when people come together with a shared vision, they can change things for the better.
“We hope that people of all ages and from all corners of the world will join us by writing their own message of peace, in a global act of solidarity for a better future for everyone.”
Celebrities and public figures including Richard Curtis, Juliet Stevenson and Hollie McNish have already pledged their messages of peace on the website. Michael Morpurgo and Chris Riddell have also given their support to the book.
Screen writer and film director Richard Curtis has written: “It was John Lennon who inspired me to join Amnesty when I was 15. Forty-five years later I realise more and more how brave and muscular his battle against war was. The world is getting better. Poverty, hunger, disease, injustice are all on the run. But it is war, war, war that is slowing down the process. If we gain peace - everything else wonderful will follow.”
Actor Juliet Stevenson’s message is: “This book is a beautiful visual version of John Lennon’s cry for peace and harmony. Its message for humanity has never been more urgently needed than now.”
Poet and spoken word artist Hollie McNish writes: "I hope that one day peace makes more money than war and destruction so that it will be on the most powerful people’s global agendas instead.”
Children’s author Michael Morpurgo said: “Never have we all, child and grown-up child, needed this more, the words and the song in our hearts, lifting our spirits, giving us hope, and determination too to find the road to understanding, conciliation and peace.”
Former Children’s Laureate Chris Riddell said the book is: “...a beautiful reimagining of John Lennon’s immortal lyrics, tender and perfectly judged.”
The ‘Imagine’ website also features an animated trailer using John Lennon’s original song, and downloadable ‘Imagine’ and International Day of Peace activity resources for schools.
As well as the online peace messages, schools, libraries and festivals will be organising activities for people to write peace messages on paper pigeons - based on the pigeon Jean Jullien has drawn to illustrate ‘Imagine’ - which will be displayed in public places around the country to celebrate International Day of Peace.
Additional information:
Ahead of the launch you can pre-order the book from the Amnesty Shop or enter a competition to win a free copy on the Amnesty UK website.
The website has been developed by leading digital studio The Creative Corporation in collaboration with publisher Frances Lincoln Children’s Books
Royalties from the sale of this book will be donated to Amnesty International.
Frances Lincoln Children’s Books is an imprint of The Quarto Group

imagine-fb_0.jpg


Paul McCartney, 75, is every inch the family man as he joins step-son on day out



www.dailymail.co.uk
Twist & Shop! The Beatles' icon Sir Paul McCartney, 75, is every inch the family man as he joins step-son Arlen Blakeman, 25, on day out
Paul's wife Nancy shares Arlen with her ex-husband and American politician Bruce Blakeman
By Lily Waddell For Mailonline
PUBLISHED: 14 August 2017

He's preparing to take the stage by storm in Australia, which will mark his first tour since 1993.
But Sir Paul McCartney put his family first on Saturday when he spent the afternoon with his step-son Arlen Blakeman, 25, at Vilebrequin in East Hampton.
British musician Paul, 75, caught the eye in his striking orange tee as he enjoyed a relaxed spot of shopping with the only child of his wife Nancy.

Twist & Shop! Sir Paul McCartney, 75, put his family first on Saturday when he spent the afternoon with step-son Arlen Blakeman, 25, at Vilebrequin in East Hampton
Twist & Shop! Sir Paul McCartney, 75, put his family first on Saturday when he spent the afternoon with step-son Arlen Blakeman, 25, at Vilebrequin in East Hampton

The iconic rocker slipped into a pair of skinny-fit chinos to complete his casual ensemble, as well as throwing on a jacket to keep off the chill.
Donning a blue hat, the bass guitarist stood out from the sea of faces in the Big Apple when he looked utterly relaxed in the good company of his young relative.

Arlen- whose father is American politician Bruce Blakeman - looked equally pleased to be spending time with his step-dad.
The star's family member pulled on a baggy hoodie and cut-off shorts for the casual outing.

It's all relative! British musician Paul, 75, caught the eye in his striking orange tee as he enjoyed a relaxed spot of shopping with his step-son 
It's all relative! British musician Paul, 75, caught the eye in his striking orange tee as he enjoyed a relaxed spot of shopping with his step-son

Paul and Nancy will celebrate their sixth wedding anniversary in October, after tying the knot at London's Marylebone register office in 2011, the same location as Paul's first marriage to James' mother Linda in 1969.
The romantic ceremony saw Arlen give his mother away to Paul after walking her down the aisle.
Aside from his step-son, the music legend has five children and he has been married three times.
He shares four children, Heather (who he legally adopted), Mary, Stella and James with his first wife Linda Eastman.
The couple exchanged vows in a romantic ceremony in 1969 and they were married until her death in 1998.




He went onto marry Heather Mills - who he shares daughter Beatrice Milly with - in 2002 but they divorced in 2008, a year after he struck up a romance with Nancy.
In July, the rocker confessed that he will no longer have an alcoholic drink before a gig to calm his nerves, out of fear he would forget the lyrics to his own songs.
In the early days, the musician used to enjoy a drink on tour ahead of a gig but he has explained it 'didn't work' as he would forget the lyrics he didn't know.
The rocker told The Mirror: 'No. I used to try drinking before a gig, particularly in the early days of Wings when we would tour.

Third time's the charm! He has been married three times and has five children but now he is happily loved up with his third wife Nancy Shevell (pictured at SVA Theatre in December 2016)
Third time's the charm! He has been married three times and has five children but now he is happily loved up with his third wife Nancy Shevell (pictured at SVA Theatre in December 2016)

'But it didn't work – I would just forget the lyrics I didn't know anyway.'
The sensational songwriter explained his fellow band members enjoy a couple of glasses of red wine to kick start them for the night.
But The Beatles icon prefers to feel 'light' on stage as he goes without eating or drinking anything 'heavy'.
He added: 'I don't eat or drink before I go on because I sort of like to feel light. Then afterwards I can get heavy and have a drink.'
The music icon, however, does grab a little bite to eat before his energetic performances.

Blast from the past! He made history alongside John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr in the iconic rock band The Beatles
Blast from the past! He made history alongside John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr in the iconic rock band The Beatles

Paul is particularly inclined to having chocolate covered raisins and an handful of salted cashews in his dressing room while he is gearing himself up for the gig
Recently, he gushed about the part he played in the phenomenon which was The Beatles, alongside John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr.
Reflecting on his time in the band, he told The Telegraph's Stellar: 'I sometimes I look at it (his role in the band) and think, "Bloody hell, it's amazing".'
It is certainly a busy time for the rocker as he recently announced he will tour Australia from December 2 as a solo artist for the first time since 1993.

Bring it on! Paul (pictured at Tokyo in April 2017) preparing to take the stage by storm in Australia
Bring it on! Paul (pictured at Tokyo in April 2017) preparing to take the stage by storm in Australia





lunes, 14 de agosto de 2017

Ringo Starr reveals how he got a little help from Paul McCartney on his new album








rock107.com
Ringo Starr reveals how he got a little help from Paul McCartney on his new album
ROCK 107
Aug 14 2017
Monday, August 14, 2017


UME

Ringo Starr‘s 19th album, Give More Love, which will be released on September 15, includes two songs featuring his fellow Beatle, Paul McCartney. Starr tells Rolling Stone that he had no trouble getting his old band mate to take part in the project.
“I just called him up and said, ‘I got this song called “Show Me the Way,” and I want you to play on it,'” Ringo reveals. “Because he is a really good friend of mine, he said he’d come to L.A. for it.”
The ex-Fab Four drummer adds, “[‘Show Me the Way’ is] about [my wife] Barbara. She shows me the way. I wanted it to be very personal. While [Paul] was there, he also played on ‘We’re on the Road Again.’ That was very kind of him.”
Starr goes on to share some gushing praise about McCartney’s musical talents.
“He’s an incredible musician,” he tells the magazine. “He’s incredible at singing too and as a writer, but for me, as a bass player, he is the finest and the most melodic. It’s always fun when we’re playing together.”
Ringo also points out that while many people comment that his collaborations with Macca are few and far between, he doesn’t feel that’s true.
“We did the Grammys [and] we did that Beatles show [CBS’ 50th anniversary special] three years ago,” he maintains. “So we are still pals, but we don’t live in each other’s pocket.”
Meanwhile, the 77-year-old Starr is preparing to launch a fall trek with his All Starr Band in October. As for whether he’d like to continue touring past his 80th birthday, Starr says, “Yeah, I love it. It’s what I do. As long as I can hold the sticks, we can go for a long time.”
Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.





domingo, 13 de agosto de 2017

Building project threatens Beatles statue in Mongolian capital





es.co.jp
Building project threatens Beatles statue in Mongolian capital
TheJapanTimes
REUTERS
AUG 12 , 2017

ULAANBAATAR – A statue of the Beatles erected in the Mongolian capital of Ulaanbaatar could be at risk amid an alleged land grab, protesters say, as rapid development turns a city once famed for wide open spaces into a cluttered metropolis.

Residents are protesting against plans to build commercial properties in an area known as Beatles Square, where a bronze bas-relief monument to the “Fab Four” commemorates the former Soviet satellite’s transition to democracy in 1990.

“For a long time there were stories about construction on the land, but nobody wanted to believe it,” said Tsoggerel Uyanga, a community organizer and senior partner at research group MAD Investment Solutions.

The monument, erected in 2008 with donations from politicians, businessmen and artists, marks the site where Mongolians gathered to talk about banned Western pop music and soon became a quirky tourist attraction.

The music of the Beatles, ABBA and other Western pop groups helped launch the “Rock and Roll Communist Revolution” that inspired a generation to fight for Mongolian democracy 30 years ago.

The protests began after an Aug. 2 announcement that construction work will start, with residents calling the project a “land grab” and expressing fears the Beatles statue could be moved or even demolished.

Authorities have defended the development as part of a “car-free street” project to build an underground shopping complex complete with street gardens.

A lawyer for Mongolia’s National Construction Association said there are no plans to remove the Beatles statue, however.

“By implementing the project, there are a great deal of advantages, such as increasing jobs and reducing traffic congestion,” said D. Uuganbayar, the lawyer.

The national association, the city government and a private contractor are leading the project.

Congestion and pollution have grown in the capital as its population has doubled over the last two decades, with thousands of impoverished herders flocking to settle in makeshift residential areas.

The strain on Ulaanbaatar’s infrastructure has forced the city to rethink its planning of urban spaces, and drawn criticism for the sale of public land to wealthy buyers.

Investors have failed in the past to deliver on promises to protect public spaces affected by development, Uyanga said, pointing to the Bogd Khan conservation area where the World Bank had raised concerns about over-development.

“It became a black market for land authorities during the early democratic years,” said Uyanga.


A statue of the Beatles stands amid construction work in front of a shopping center in Ulaanbaatar on Wednesday. | REUTERS


sábado, 12 de agosto de 2017

The weird conspiracy theory which suggests that Paul McCartney actually died in 1966









stocknewsusa.com
The weird conspiracy theory which suggests that Paul McCartney actually died in 1966
By Nilgun Salim
August 11, 2017

Paul McCartney died

If you are Beatles fan you have certainly heard about the famous conspiracy theory about how the real Paul McCartney died in 1966 and the man who replaced him it’s actually someone who looks a lot like him.

According to WorldNewsDailyReport, Ringo Starr has revealed during an exclusive interview with Hollywood Inquirer in 2015 that the real Paul McCartney died in a car accident on 9th November 1966.

After the crash, he was replaced by a man named William Shears Campbell, who was the winner of a contest the band would have organized incognito at that time and who happened to look a lot like McCartney.
“When Paul died, we all panicked”, said the Beatles drummer at that time.
“We did not know what to do, and Brian Epstein, our manager, suggested that we hire Billy Shears as a temporary solution. He should have been our colleague for a week or two, but nobody got caught up at that time, so we continued to sing with Billy, who turned out to be a good musician.The only problem was that he did not get along with John (Lennon). ”
Starr claims that, over the years, The Beatles has launched several cryptic messages to prepare the audience for the truth.
He says the album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band is full of clues about Paul’s death.
Image result for paul mccartney dead
“We wanted to tell the world the truth, but we were afraid of what reaction we could have caused. We thought the whole planet would hate us for the lies and preferred to throw clues.”
Related image
According to WorldNewsDailyReport, Ringo Starr finally decided to tell the truth when he turned the 74.
The rumors of McCartney’s death appeared more than 45 years ago but they were constantly denied by band members and their close associates.
Image result for paul mccartney dead


viernes, 11 de agosto de 2017

Ringo Starr Talks New LP, Future Deluxe Beatles Albums, Paul McCartney






 


www.rollingstone.com
Ringo Starr Talks New LP, Future Deluxe Beatles Albums, Paul McCartney
"I hope they do the White Album and 'Abbey Road,'" he says
By Andy Greene
Aug 10 2017


Ringo Starr
Kevin Mazur/WireImage

For his 19th solo album, Ringo Starr planned to record his first country album since 1970's Beaucoups of Blues. But when his touring schedule made an extended trip to Nashville impossible, Ringo decided to simply work in his living room, inviting old friends like Peter Frampton, Dave Stewart, his brother-in-law Joe Walsh and Paul McCartney to collaborate. "It ended up like a regular Ringo album with a ballad, a country song, a rock song," says the drummer, whose new album, Give More Love, is out September 15th. "It's always very casual. With Pro Tools, you don't need all that space like we had in Abbey Road. Sometimes the dog will bark, and it ends up on the track." Ringo, 77, is approaching his 30th year leading his All-Starr Band, whose long-running lineup includes Steve Lukather (Toto), Gregg Rolie (Journey, Santana), Richard Page (Mr. Mister) and Todd Rundgren. The band's fall tour includes a Las Vegas residency in October.


Ringo Starr and his All Starr Band
Scott Robert Ritchie


How did Paul wind up taking part in sessions for the new album? Well, I just called him up and said,"I got this song called 'Show Me the Way,' and I want you to play on it." Because he is a really good friend of mine, he said he'd come to L.A. for it. It's about [my wife] Barbara. She shows me the way. I wanted it to be very personal. While he was there, he also played on "We're on the Road Again." That was very kind of him.
You two still sound great together.He's an incredible musician. He's incredible at singing too and as a writer, but for me, as a bass player, he is the finest and the most melodic. It's always fun when we're playing together. I've played on several of his records, mainly in the Nineties. People keep saying, "Oh, it’s been so long." It's not been that long. We did the Grammys, we did that Beat­les show three years ago. So we are still pals, but we don't live in each other's pocket.

paul-mccartney-ringo-starr-reunite-santa-monica-2-pp
PHOTO CREDIT: AKM -GSI
There are a couple of country songs on the album that remind me ofBeaucoups of Blues. What are your memories of that time in your life?
I went down to Nashville and we did it in two days. I did it because Pete Drake came to England to play [pedal steel] on George's record [All Things Must Pass] and I was playing [drums] on it. I sent my car to get him and he noticed I had a lot of country tapes. He was talking to me about coming to Nashville to make a record and he'll produce it. I was thinking I didn't want to spend months in Nashville. He said "What are you talking about?Nashville Skyline took two days." So I went to Nashville and I got there on Monday, we did the record Tuesday, Wednesday, and I left Thursday. And that's how we did it! Five songs a day!
On "Electricity," you give a shout-out to Johnny Guitar, from your pre-Beatles band Rory Storm and the Hurricanes.When I changed my name to Ringo, he changed his to Johnny Guitar. I had left [my job at] the factory, and this was the first real job as a musician. I have great memories of being in that band. If you look back at my recent solo records, there's always some mention of Rory and the Hurricanes in it. I don't wanna write the book – I write it in songs. If you want to read my book, you'll have to buy 15 CDs and put it all together.
On your new song "Laughable," which you co-wrote with Peter Frampton, you sing "It would laughable if it weren't so sad." I presume you're talking about Trump?
Well you know I'm not political. Peter Frampton added that line. We had discussions where he wanted the words to be more political. And I was against that, and it's my record so you know what that's what I do. I direct it. But I felt we still said the same things and it's understood that it would be laughable if it wasn't so said. But no I'm not gonna mention people and parties because I feel like we can do this in a much better way.

Ringo Starr and Peter Frampton
Your drums sound louder than ever on the new Sgt. Pepper box set.They are! Giles [Martin, son of George Martin] has turned me up. I love it! We couldn't do that in the Sixties. If anything, when we were mastering, we were taking off the bottom all the time, and the bottom was my bass drum. You should go to the Love show [in Las Vegas]. It's like drum boogie. It's so far-out.
What role did you take in putting together the Sgt. Pepper set?Giles remastered it, they sent it to me, and I said I loved it. There's another bonus CD with different bits – the big piano that we all played for that one chord [on "A Day in the Life"]. That is so interesting, even for me, who's on the damn thing. I just love it. It’s a bit like the Eight Days a Week[documentary] that Ron Howard did. I was so moved emotionally by looking at that, and I'm in it, for God's sake.



It was interesting to see a Beatles film that focused only on your touring career.It just showed us as four lads. We were always being ordered to play stadiums since we couldn't play regular gigs. We stopped touring because we all felt we weren't playing that well. I couldn't hear what the other three were doing. I'd have to look at their actions and go, "Oh, yeah, we went into that part now." Then we split up, of course. But I think [touring] is part of the four of us – that's what we always liked to do.
Are you going to release deluxe editions of the other albums?I hope they do the White Album and Abbey Road.
How about Revolver and Rubber SoulI don't know. Let's say yes! [Laughs] If we don't, forgive me.
You're heading out with the All-Starr Band this fall. Do you still want to be doing this in three years when you enter your eighties?Yeah, I love it. It's what I do. As long as I can hold the sticks, we can go for a long time.

Watch below: 5 little-known facts about "A Day in the Life," considered by many to be the Beatles' single greatest recorded achievement